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Chiropractic and X-ray

Posted on August 7, 2017 at 9:13 PM Comments comments (24)
  Having been a Chiropractor for over 35 years, I have definite considerations about
the use of X-ray in the Chiropractic Office. Is it necessary?  Only if you want your doctor to know what is wrong with you before he begins his work. The motto is "know before you go".
  Yes, results can be achieved without the use of x-ray, but why put your health at risk. Would you go into the hospital  for heart surgery if the doctor didn't know what was needed. You wouldn't want the doctor to guess, there might not be a second guess.
  In Chiropractic the only way to "know" is to see the spine, thus the necessity of x-ray. In my first 30 years of practice, I would never adjust a patient without an x-ray. To do so would be a
ripoff to the patient. I also used full spine x-rays, which show the entire spine as the patient stands. If you are going to correct a patients posture, you better know what is making it go out
of alignment.
  I know that there are Chiropractic offices around who offer low cost service and do not require an x-ray.  So its up to the patient, do you want to take a chance on a guess or do you
require certainty.
  I have also done considerable research on the negative effects of radiation on the body.  Many years ago radiation was used to cure disease, where now days it is considered to cause it.  So its up to the discretion of the Chiropractor to use or not use x-ray.  Having had a couple of large Chiropractic offices, I now practice out of my apartment in North Hollywood.  So I do
treat some patients without an x-ray, but I always tell them that to really know what is going on with their spine, an x-ray is needed. I refer them to an imaging center where the cost is about $50, well worth it as there are some spinal situations that if undiagnosed can inhibit the patient response. As an example, I had a friend come to see me for Chiropractic care, and after adjusting his spine on two occasions, I felt that an x-ray was needed.  After so many years, the doctor just know when something is needed.  So since he was a Veterinarian he went to his office and took an x-ray.  Sure enough he had a spondylolisthesis of L-5, which requires a specific type of adjustment, not the routine type. Without that information, I would not have gotten good results and in fact could have worsened his condition.
  In closing, let me say that I regularly hear from a patient that their doctor took x-rays and said that there was nothing wrong.  Really?  In all of my years of practice, I have never, ever seen a spinal x-ray that did not show something wrong. It all depends on who is doing the looking.



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